This blog is essentially a scrapbook. I put up random snippets that I hope you will enjoy reading. They may be analytical and open your eyes to new perspectives, or they may be factual and topple your frame of reference. Some could even be funny and make you laugh. Ultimately, the idea is to have a wide variety of accessible content that either adds to what you know, reiterates it, or counters it.

GOOD VS GREAT LEADERSHIP

This excellent article from HBR explains the difference between good leadership and great leadership. Lest you think that one is better than the other, watch out, your ideas are going to be shattered! “Great has no inherent moral compass, and thus its unpredictable potency can just as easily be put toward pugilistic and peaceful purposes.” That’s not the case with good leadership. Source: HBR.org

HOW INDIA DEFINES ITS TRIBES

According to Sumit Guha, India’s tribes have been officially defined, at least since the 1960s, as five key features. These are (according to Guha) primitive traits, distinctive culture, geographical isolation, shyness of contact with outsiders and backwardness. Source: EPW Image: Tribes of India

“REDUCED TO THE MAX”

Featured here are the work of Kevin Krautgartner from his series “Reduced to the Max”. Kevin is a fine art, landscape and architectural photographer based in Wuppertal, Germany. Source: Abduzeedo

THE ECONOMIST GETS ITS ‘IF’; LET’S SEE IF IT COMES TRUE

As a companion to its widely popular The World in (Year), which arrives at the end of the year and looks at the yeah ahead, the Economist magazine has started publishing a ‘The World If’ section in the middle of every year. This year, the supplement was published in the issue for July 16-22, and the first story was ‘If Donald Trump became president’. It is a bleak read about the world ganging up on America, and contains this prophetic line: “In October, top-secret files had appeared on the Internet, allegedly extracted by hackers from Mrs Clinton’s private e-mail server.” Source and Image: The Economist

SOME FACTS ON DALIT DISCRIMINATION

Using data from an NSS survey, researches found that in 2012, persons belonging to Scheduled Castes earned 8% less than forward caste persons in the public sector, and 20% less in the private sector. Discrimination accounted for 10% and 24% of this wage differential, according to the report in EPW. While the first statistic is easy to quantify and understand. I am unable to comprehend how they could ascertain the degree of impact caused by discrimination bias. I am also grateful that the differential figures are as low as they are. Source: EPW Image: Sherborneslaw.co.uk

A HISTORY OF SPACE GUNS

People have wanted to build space guns (a super long cannon that can hurl projectiles into space, rendering rockets obselete) for almost three centuries. The idea came from Issac Newton in his book, A Treatise of the System of the World. Germany used a space gun to bomb Paris in World War I, and was building similar guns to bomb London in World War II, when the factory making them was itself bombed. Even Saddam Hussein attempted get himself a space gun. Source and Image: Inverse

RESEARCHERS COME UP WITH BENDABLE AIRCRAFT WINGS

Engineers at MIT and NASA have come up with a bendable, “morphing” wing, for aeroplanes. It could also simplify the manufacturing process — wings are extremely difficult to make, and considered an industrial secret — while reducing fuel consumption by improving aerodynamics and agility. Read more here. Source and Image: MIT  

WHEN THE PAST COMES IN THE WAY OF THE FUTURE…

Just because you didn’t like what your boss did yesterday or last week or last month doesn’t mean you should go hostile today, says Seth Godin. Narrating our lives, he says, is a survival mechanism. But it also hotwires our feelings, changes our posture, limits our possibilities. The narrative is useful as long as it’s helping you solve problems and move forward. But when it doesn’t, it’s time to drop it. Source: Seth Godin

OCEANIC COFFEE TABLES

The Abyss Horizon Table is a circular coffee table with a majestic cross-section of the sea. Designed by Christopher Duffy, it took over a year to develop. Only 25 pieces of the table, which features layers of high-grade wood from ecologically-managed forests and blue glass, were made. Duffy has used the concept before to make rectangular coffee tables and dining tables. Source and Image: Design Milk